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(At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.) 
 
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'the Ridge' and its Township names from 1673 to 1900.
"the Ridge" and its Township names from 1673 to 1900.


 
 
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1833-60 the Roman Catholic Church in Northeastern, Illinois, 1833-60, her Priests and their Baptisms, Marriages, and Funerals.
1833-60 the Roman Catholic Church in Northeastern, Illinois, 1833-60, her Priests and their Baptisms, Marriages, and Funerals.
Prior to 1833 French Priests from Montreal traveled down the Great Lakes to Chicago and thence to the Mississippee River, as far south as St. Joe, Missouri providing services to the Catholics scattered in Illinois, Wisconsin, Iowa, Minnisota and Missouri, none of which then existed.

With the loss of Montreal under French General Montcalm to British General Wolfe at the battle of the Plains of Abraham on June 24th, 1759 the French Missionary Priests began a slow retreat back to Canada taking their records with them.

In the year 1833, May 5th specifically the first Catholic Priest, Rev. John Mary Iraenaeus St. Cyr, a young Frenchman and priest of only one month, arrived in Chicago as the first Catholic Pastor. His congregation being those few Catholics in Chicago's 300 total population, he immediately began recording the Baptisms, marriages, and deaths of his Irish, English, French and German Parishoners. Those records exist to this day and give a clear picture of the early settlers of Chicago.

His first Baptism, on May 22, 1833 was that of George Beaubien; parents: Mark Beaubien and Monique Nadierne; sponsors: Mark Beaubien and Marianne Arriage.

In May of 1836 Chicago saw its second Catholic Priest, Father Bernard Schaeffer, arrive. Fr. Schaeffer had previously ministered in Strassburg, Alsace, a European University City under the jurisdiction of France and also Germany, depending on the power of the day. Strassburg is West of the Rhine and north, northwest of Switzerland. At that time German Citizens of the area would identify themselves as Prussian.  
 
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1837   'Early Settlers' of 8 miles north of Chicago on Lake Michigan....1837 to 1845.....'the Ridge'.....'Indian Boundary Trail'
1837 "Early Settlers" of 8 miles north of Chicago on Lake Michigan....1837 to 1845....."the Ridge"....."Indian Boundary Trail"
According to John Muno, and recorded by Albert Joseph Fortman about 1980........
"Peter Muno came with Peter Phillips father in 1842. Took 5 days (more like 65) to cross the ocean. At that time (meaning 1840's?) Philip Rogers owned from Kedzie to Lake and south of Touhy to Pratt." (actual title search shows Peter Schmidt Sr bought 42.65 acres from John Smith and his Wife on May 9, 1842....an area from Morse to Pratt....Ridge to Western).
"Phillips owned 60 acres north of Touhy from Western to Ridge."
"Father (Muno) bought 40 acres south of Touhy from Western to Kedzie."

"Zender founded (Tavern probably) 1845"
"1st settlers on Indian Boundary Trail (oldest in Chicago)" This is Rogers Ave now.

"Peter Phillip - President Rogers Park Bank" this is probably the Phillips Bank of Rogers Park.

"His mother was a Petery" "(Luxemburg)"
 
 
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1839 The Fortmann migration decision in Sudlohne, Germany
1839 The Fortmann migration decision in Sudlohne, Germany
Heinrich, Anna Maria, and Clemens decide to go to America on that cold winter day in Sudlohne. 
 
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1852   Henry Fortman, b. 1802, Germany...farmer (1850 Census, New Trier)....Rev?....Pastor of St. Joseph's Catholic Church 1847 - 1852,  said Mass in the Schmidt House on 'the Ridge'
1852 Henry Fortman, b. 1802, Germany...farmer (1850 Census, New Trier)....Rev?....Pastor of St. Joseph's Catholic Church 1847 - 1852, said Mass in the Schmidt House on "the Ridge"
from: The Life and Writings of the Right Reverend John McMullen, D.D.: First Bishop of Davenport, Iowa

p. 60.......McHenry (Township, Illinois), March 20, 1852.

"I had the pleasure pf spending a few Days among friends in this vicinity....Not more than three or four miles from McHenry town there are two settlements of German Catholics, one on each side of the Fox River."
"On the the west side of the river a very handsome and sufficiently capacious frame church 75 by 32, was commenced in 1850, and plastered and completed this year."
"It was solemnly blessed by the Bishop of Chicago, and dedicated in honor of St John the Baptist, on the second Sunday of November last (1851) when the sacrament of Confirmation was also administered to sixty-three children and adults."

"THE CONGREGATION HAS HITHERTO BEEN ATTENDED BY THE REV. HENRY FORTMANN, OF NEW TRIER, COOK COUNTY."

"Rev. T.B. Regal was afterward appointed to take charge it it, but was sent to Joliet, where the German Catholics desired to have a priest of their language, and where they have since begun to lay the foundation of a church for their own use."
 
 
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1871   Expenses of Building the Schmitt aka Schmidt aka Smith House
recorded in 1871, original accounting document w/D.A. Fortman
1871 Expenses of Building the Schmitt aka Schmidt aka Smith House recorded in 1871, original accounting document w/D.A. Fortman
Carpenter Work:........Cash.............$750.....
Mason Work:............Cash.............$600.....
Plastering:............Cash.............$250.....
Lumber:.................................$750.....
Sash and Moulding:......................$150.....
Lime and cement:........................$125.....
Locks and Things:........................$75....
Paint and Painters:.....................$100....
Brick:..................................$675....
Lumber at Evanston:......................$75....
Freight:.................................$50....
Tinsmith:................................$63....
Stone Work:..............................$50....
Carpenter Cash:..........................$50....
Moulding Door:...........................$50....
Total:.................................$3813....
Other Cash payments:...................$1337....
Grand Total:...........................$5150.  
 
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1874   The Murder of Henry Muno Jr.
1874 The Murder of Henry Muno Jr.
Summer of 1874....Henry Muno (Jr), 39 years of age, was walking home to his wife and children that night when out of the darkness sprang his theif and murderer. Henry had $25.00 in his pocket and for this he was murdered.
Henry was going to his home on Touhy Ave. near Western. He was returning on foot from a visit to his mother-in-law, Mrs. John Zender, wife of another early Ridgeville settler. The murderer was never found but he was believed to be a hired hand of the neighbor who knew the money Henry was carrying. Henry's wife was left with seven sons and one daughter to care for. Her picture was carried in the local paper showing her with her children.
When this occurred, Mrs. Peter Muno, mother of the slain man, was living alone in the little farmhouse on "the Ridge". But she was by no means deserted by her three daughters, all of whom were married then living in homes in the vicinity. They came to visit her almost daily. One of them, Mrs. John Weber-occupied a house just north of the old Muno homestead. There, too, went her widowed daughter-in-law and her grandchildren.
After the death of Mrs. Muno in 1895 the farmhouse was vacant for a number of years. Then it was acquired by Joseph Winkin, who moved into it with his new bride.
The neighbors at that time were the Rogerses, Touhys, Zenders, Schmidts, Fortmanns, Marshalls, Kyles, Scchers, Phillips, and schneiders. 
 
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1884    WAR AMONG THE SMITHS
The Trouble on Rock Creek Last Tuesday
Published by: Aspen Weekly Times May 31, 1884
1884 WAR AMONG THE SMITHS The Trouble on Rock Creek Last Tuesday Published by: Aspen Weekly Times May 31, 1884
Aspen Weekley Times May 31, 1884......................"Everyone in Aspen knows Charley Smith, who in company with Mr Corkhill built the Opera House on Hopkins Avenue..........
Charley took up a ranch on Rock Creek in 1881 and since then, one by one, his Mother, Brothers and Sister have come out to the County and made their home with him.
It will be remembered that his father* accidently shot himself near Ashcroft about a year ago."
.....................
*D Fortman note:
(Accidentally shooting and killing himself was Jacob Schmidt, twin Brother of Peter Schmidt of Ridge Ave, Chicago. Charley's Mother is Barbara Agnes Smith, Jacob's wife). And, while speculative on my part, it is possible that the Chicago Fire of 1871 was a determinate factor in sparking this migration west as well as the lure of gold mining in the West.............
"For some time Charley and Frank Smith have been living with S.S. Sears, who owns the ranch adjoining the Smith place, leaving Mrs. Smith (a lady about 60 years of age), John, about 24 years,
Henry 19, Joe 17 and Aggie about 14 years of age, living at the Smith cabin..........
On last Tuesday evening the 19th, Mr Sears and Charley and Frank Smith went up to the Smith cabin after two bellows that belonged to them. Some words were exchanged in the cabin, and when the newcomers went out, John followed with a Colt's heavy caliber revolver in his right hand. John it seems was in a rage and ordered Mr. Sears and his brothers off the ranch.
Mr Sears walked on with the bellows he was carrying, but Frank walked up to John, who struck him with the revolver.
Charlie grabbed John and the revolver went off accidently, doing no damage.
Joe Smith, who had also come out of the cabin, at this point went back again, as it is thought, after a gun and Frank pulled away from John and followed him.
Charley had John down on the ground and was trying to hold him, and Miss Aggie Smith was pounding him on the head with a stone, trying to make him let John up.
John got away from Charlie at last and rushed into the cabin where Frank and Joe were wrestling for the possessioln of both the gun and the revolver.
Mrs. Smith locked the door.
Mr Sears states that Charlie went over to where he was standing; but John says that he was trying to break the door in with rocks, and that one rock came through the panel when the shot went off.
Only those who were in the cabin know the particulars of what occurred.
John's statement made to the reporter, is that he, John and Frank were wrestling for possession of the rifle (a Sharp's Hammerless, set with a hair trigger) and that he got it and went to the window to look for Charlie; that Frank grabbed the gun by the muzzel and at the same time kicked John in the stomach, making him drop the breech, which struck on the floor, and the gun went off, the ball going through Frank's left shoulder in an upward direction.
John immediately opened the door, and saw Charlie running toward Sears, and called him to come back. He then commenced tearing the clothing from Frank's arm and to staunch the blood.
Charlie went to Sears cabin, and got a revolver and knife and returned, and calling him vile epithets, threatened to kill him. He told him to stop his foolishness and help take care of the wounded man.
Joe then went and caught John's horse, who set out immediately for the Springs, where he gave himself up to Sheriff Rock, asking him for protection, thinking that Charlie and Sears were following him.
Mr. Sears came up to Aspen, starting about half past seven and getting here at 10 o'clock that evening--making the distance of about 35 miles in 2 and 1/2 hours. He summonend Dr. Teller, who started out about 11:00 and swore out a warrant for John C. Smith, which Sheriff Gavitt took and started for the Grand.
Andy Rock brought the prisoner to Aspen on Wednesday, and Mr White of Rock Creek, brought Charley and Frank, the wounded man, up the same day.
Joe Smith swore out a warrant against Charlie before Justice Hart, of Satank, and John also swore out another one before Justice Barlow at the Springs. One is for assault with fists and threats.
On Thursday morning, at Mrs. Finks on Durant Street, Drs. Teller and Slagle performed a very delicate surgical operation upon the shoulder of the wounded man, which consisted in taking out the shattered bones and thoroughly cleansing the wound. They pronounced the operation as being eminently successful and that the patient has a fair chance of recoery, though it will be a long time before he will have any use of his left arm.
As the Smith ranch is in Garfield County, the preliminary examination of Mr. John C. Smith will be had before Justice Barlow as soon as the doctors can pronounce with any degree of certainty upon the result of Frank's wounds.
Sheriff Rock and John started back for the Springs Thursday afternoon.
The trouble as John stated to the reporter, was about the ranch, and it had been brewing for several months. The wounded man stated to the reporter that he considered it accidental shooting. 
 
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1951 Russian Patrol Ships 'Orel' & 'Korshun'
1951 Russian Patrol Ships "Orel" & "Korshun"
These two ships were operating in a Baltic Fleet Exercise with Russian U-9 German captured submarines on 23 March 1951 in the Atlantic Ocean some 650 miles off the SW coast of Ireland. They heard the C-124's MAYDAY and the English translators aboard the subs and ships immediately knew that the crew was 53 US Airmen. Messages immmediately went to Moscow and shortly thereafter the order to attempt a capture was given by Stalin in Moscow. President Truman and the US joint Chiefs of Staff would have known of these messages and the risk to the 53 men.
The subs captured the men splitting the group into two groups. They then proceeded north to a rendevouz point this these two surface ships. The captured POW's were transferred to the "Orel" and the "Korshun.". These two ship rounded northern England at flank speed and steering south entered the Baltic sea proceeding toward their Naval Base at Baltiysk, Russia which they entered on 28 or 29 March after clearing the channel cutting the spit of land protecting their base.
The 53 prisoner's were then transported by truck the 25 miles to Kaliningrad for interrogation on SAC nuclear bombing strategies and weapons.
Upon completion of this interrogation the men were split into small groups, turned over to the NVD and shipped to Russian Slave-Labor Camps.
They rest in the lands of "Mother Russia" where they died sometime after May 1951. 
 
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783 Catholic Bishops of Osnabruck, Munster and Fortmann's
783 Catholic Bishops of Osnabruck, Munster and Fortmann's
Excel: A timeline chart of Bishops, Princes and Fortmann's from 783 to 1700  
 
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Castle of Minden Bishops
Castle of Minden Bishops
Minden Bishops from 780 to 1600---Minden Bishops were followers of the Bishop of Koln's policy's. 
 
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Escaping the Great Chicago Fire Oct 1871......The City Cemetery in today's Grant Park.  Stone Mauselium of Ira Couch 1806-1857 still resides behind the Chicago Historical Society.
Escaping the Great Chicago Fire Oct 1871......The City Cemetery in today's Grant Park. Stone Mauselium of Ira Couch 1806-1857 still resides behind the Chicago Historical Society.
 
 
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Fortmann Marriages from 1500 to 1800
Fortmann Marriages from 1500 to 1800
This is a 300 year timeline chart of the Lohne,Germany Families that married a Fortmann Ancestor of ours. Dominant lineage names are included and you may track them. 
 
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Northern Germany Catholic Bishops, Princes & Fortmann's 783-1700
Northern Germany Catholic Bishops, Princes & Fortmann's 783-1700
Chronilogical display of Oldenburg & Munster Catholic Bishops, Princes & Fortmann's from 783 to 1700 
 
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This is a Timeline, 1600 - 1856 of Lerher [teachers] in Sudlohne, Germany
This is a Timeline, 1600 - 1856 of Lerher [teachers] in Sudlohne, Germany
This Chronology of Fortmann and Polking Lerhers shows you which of your Fortmann, Polking, and neighbor children were educated by each Lerher during their teaching years in the one-room school-house of Sudlohne. 
 



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